Chapter 5 – Additional Strategies to Encourage Inquiry, Reading, and Writing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1N6srtNU3sMqyGy948jvRlqa8jGaKU8Yv/view

  • Peer-review assignment instructions

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●  From the NGSS, the resource mentioned above can be found on their main website for discussing the use of phenomena in science, and is available under a Creative Commons license. Additionally, that page links to other resources from the Research and Practice Collaboratory as well as a video from the Teaching Channel.

●  Maintained by TJ McKenna, a professor at Boston University focused on Science Education, the Phenomena for NGSS website includes a searchable database of dozens of examples, each with images or video clips. Similarly, the Wonder of Science website created by 2011 Montana Teacher of the Year Paul Andersen has dozens of examples, sorted by grade level and available as a Google Doc with links.

●  Finally, Karla from Sunrise Science (2018) has collected a number of additional links that lead to even more websites and organizations focusing on phenomena in her post, “Free Websites for Finding NGSS Anchoring Phenomena.” 

● Identifying that Plant, created by plant aficionado Angelyn Whitmeyer, offers a number of its own resources for plant ID, including a gallery of plant portraits, and also links out to numerous other plant ID websites. 

● OneZoom, a charitable organization from the UK, has created the interactive Tree of Life Explorer, “[a]n interactive map of the evolutionary relationships between 2,123,179 species of life on our planet,” inviting users to see unique connections in a way that only interactive media can provide. 

● The Concord Consortium offers teachers and students “scientifically accurate virtual labs and hands-on digital tools.” Available for free, the vast collection of resources is easily searchable, and teachers can create a class dashboard by signing up for a free account. 

● The Writing Fix, a site created by a writing teacher and former National Writing Project site director, Corbett Harrison, contains countless lessons, including an entire section on general strategies for writing across the curriculum, with additional ideas for science, math, and other content areas. 

● As a long-time favorite of writing teachers, Barry Lane has been encouraging students to use their voices, making non-fiction writing both a creative and engaging process. His book (and companion website), 51 Wacky We-Search Reports: Face the Facts With Fun (2003) offers a variety of fun ideas. In addition, he has made many of the strategies available for free in a PDF handout, also linked on this chapter’s companion page. 

● Though only available as a PDF, the Michigan Department of Education produced a number of writing across the curriculum guidebooks that are filled with many ideas. The Writing Across the Curriculum: Science guide, co-authored with the Michigan Science Teachers Association, is available as a link, too.